Oriental Room

Oriental Room

Most of the Caucasian Royal collections at the Russian museum of Ethnography are from the 18th through early 20th centuries. It was a period of Russian urban culture, notable for intense interest in the Orient and in collecting Islamic art objects. Many of these objects were used to decorate palace interiors. Iranian and Turkish tiles, carpets and textiles, Caucasian weapons and brass utensils were displayed in the so-called "Oriental Rooms".

In Russia "Oriental" fashion combined with a much earlier tradition of using works of Oriental art to decorate festive interiors. This movement was very much initiated by Catharine the Great in the 18th century and was inspired by events in Her own life. The ideas caught on and Russian noblemen began creating "Oriental Rooms" in their palaces and privet homes. As a result in the late 18th to the early 19th centuries, cozy "Oriental" smoking rooms and libraries became favorite places for the young aristocracy to relax. In the 19th century St.Petersburg it was practically impossible to find a rich house or even an apartment without sofa with a carpet on the floor and some weapons hanging on the walls.

Rich "Oriental" collections were brought by Tsesarevich Nicholas Alexandrovich in 1890-1891 from his "Travel to the Orient"