Jar for wine and water. Georgians. Gori. Georgia. Late 19th century

Jar for wine and water. Georgians. Gori. Georgia. Late 19th century

The flourishing of pottery in Georgia can be explained not only by the abundance and variety of quality clay or the long-standing tradition of the craft but the fact that clay vessels were necessitated by viniculture. The wine culture developed to an incomparable level and influenced the production of all of all utensils related to the making, storing and especially of drinking wine. It was impossible to make wine without ceramic. for the fermentation process large clay vessels were used, which were buried in the ground and were equal in size to the height of a man.

Goblets and dishes were given different names, depending on their use and shape. There is a wide range of dishes and goblets in existence adapted for the guests, merry-makers and the occasions. The most popular were the sura and the doki. The sura is a tall, refined dish with long narrow neck, sometimes with handle in the shape of a wall clamp. The doki is larger than the sura, round with a short neck, without a stand. The chinchila is small, its contents no greater than of a normal glass of wine. 

Beautiful ceramic were not confined to receptacles for wine alone, but also for milk, vegetables and meat. There were also ceramic copies of copper oil lamps. The fact that all kinds of shapes were copied in a variety of materials including clay, copper, stone and wood is a fascinating fact in itself