Jar for wine and water. Georgians. Gori. Georgia. Late 19th century

Jar for wine and water. Georgians. Gori. Georgia. Late 19th century

Wine casks were made from simple earthenware but this did not limit the variety of their design. Georgian ceramics varied according to where they were produced, the processing technique, the function for which the vessel was intended and the creativity in the decoration and design. 

Wine and water stored in simple unglazed casks remains cooler longer. These vessels were usually painted, albeit not in bright colours. This kind of ceramic was widespread. There were many techniques used for making the ceramic more attractive. It is believed that the black polished vessels in Georgia were in use earlier hat in ancient Rome. The method and technique prescribed is still held in great respect today.

In towns, single colour, painted and glazed plates were widely sold. Various motifs, related to the grape were often introduced: bunches of grapes, vine tendrils or depictions of vineyards, etc. since the Georgians potter's fantasy was not restricted, in contrast to some other peoples', they also produced splendid wine casks bearing figures of people and animals. Their favourite subjects were taken from ancient cultures and included the deer, ox and ram. Using illustration depicting men and women afforded the opportunity of including costume details. However, the most remarkable feature in Georgian pottery was the intricate way inter-connecting vessels in all shapes and sizes and dimensions were linked. These vessels were used for drinking wine during rituals and were a reflection of collectivism. A similar complex of inter-linking vessels is said to be found at farmsteads for storing vine.